Withstanding Natural Disasters

Science 

Created for a Fourth Grade Class

By Jordan Warner and Shaun Pennington


jwarner@franklincollege.edu

spennington@franklincollege.edu

Natural Disasters


Introduction
Task
Process
Evaluation 
Conclusion
Teacher Page
Credits & References


         Introduction


TAKE COVER!    IT"S COMING!    RUN!    GET OUT BEFORE IT"S TOO LATE!

Have you ever heard these things when refering to a natural disaster or witnessed the effects? Can you name a couple types of weather-related disasters and what causes these phenomena to occur? As a group watch this video clip which exemlifies one severe natural disaster; Hurricane Katrina - 2005. Discuss what effects this storm had on the city of New Orleans and its citizens. Futhermore, click on this link to investigate other disasters such as Tornados, Earthquakes, and Volcanoes.

In each circumstance homes were detroyed, lives were lost, priceless treasures gone: could this have been prevented?



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        Task


Now, you are going to design a structure capable of withstanding natural disasters.  To  accomplish this task members of the group will research building materials, designs, and geographical locations best suited for withstanding disasters such as Volcanoes, Floods, Tornados, and Earthquakes.Earthquake Home

After the design is finished, the home will be checked for weaknesses and flaws to assure that when you hear things such as TAKE COVER!    IT"S COMING!    RUN!    GET OUT BEFORE IT"S TOO LATE! You will be worry free and safe from earth's destruction in your disaster proof home.




        Process


When storm sirens sound, where do you go and what do you do? Does your family go to the most structurally safe portion of your home for protection? Every year thousands of home are distroyed and lives are vastly affected through storm damages.  Use your own personal experiences and what you will discover through this WebQuest to create a disaster proof home capable of withstanding several types of natural disasters and storms.  You and your group will build a home which will be presented to the entirety of the class and be tested for structural stability!

1. Your teacher has put you into groups based on the best working environment for this webquest.

2. In your group, the teacher will assigned jobs . There will be the Quality Control Facilitator, the Engineer, the Enviromental Coordinator , and the Director of Operations.  All of you will work together, but the job holders will be in charge of their assigned position.

  • The Quality Control Facilitator will be the gatherer of materials. This person will research and select contracting materials capable of withstanding the mentioned distatsters.  
  • The Engineer will desgin the overall structure of the home. This person will desgin how the structure should look and design the structural make-up of the home. They will also be assigned to make any corrections needed to the structure of the home. 
  • The Enviromental Coordinator will select the best possible are for the homes location. This person will be in charge of selecting the location of the home based on the area that creates best chances for durability.
  • The Director of Operations will test the homes design. This person will be in charge of testing the the homes design and materials for weakness as well as report necessary corrections to the engineer. 
3.  At this time, the Quality Control Facilitator will begin researching contracting materials by visiting the following link. Be sure to document what types of materials will be used for each part of the home such as: roofing, foundation, framework, windows, and any other materials that will be used to provide a structurally sound home.

4.  As the Quality Control Facilitator is researching and selecting building materials the Engineer will visit this link to research possible structural designs of the home.  When creating this blue-print, be sure that this home is capable of withstanding natural disasters, which designs are the strongest?

5.  Environmental Coordinator will conduct research on safest landscape locations by following this link and then selecting the best possible area for the home to be built. This location must be within United States borders, however there are no limitations as to which state this home must reside in.

6. Simultaneously, the Director of Operations will research homes that have been destroyed in natural disasters by visiting the following link. Could any of these homes survived if they had been built with different materials or in different locations?

7. Now, after research has been conducted the building process will begin. Students will use provided materials from a local recycling center to represent the materials that were found during the research phase. At this point the Quality Control Facilitator will have selected the building materials that will be used for home construction. The Engineer and Enviornmental Coordinator will have selected both the overall design of the home, and its geographic location.

8. Initially, the Quality Control Facilitator will present selected materials to the Engineer so that this person can in turn use those materials to construct the home. The Director of Operations may assist the Engineer with consrtuction, however no advice or corrections may be offered at this point; this person is simply an extra set of hands.

9. At the conclusion building phase, the Director of Opertaions can now critique the design of the home, and building materials making corrections as this person sees fit.

10.  At this time the Engineer will make any corrections to the homes structure reported by the Director of Operations.

11. Next, the Enviromental Coordinator will take the home outside and choose the best possible location for the home to be placed.

12. Once placed at the best possible location, the Director of Operations will need to consult the teacher for further instruction on how to test the home for each natural disatser. Tests will be conducted to measure the structural integrity of the home, and its capability to withstand the selected natural disasters: Tornados, Flooding, Volcanos, and Earthquakes.

13. Once the Director of Operations has consulted with the teacher, it is time to begin testing.

14.  If the home happens to be distorted an any way during the testing phase, the Director of Operations will be given one opportunity to make structural corrections to the home.

15. After corrections have been made, the group will once again test the home. At the conclusion of the testing period, the group will now return to the classroom

16.  At this point, each member of the group will use a "cause and effect" graphic organizer provided by the teacher to document the results and outcomes of the testing stage.

Congratulations! You have now discovered how to best construct a home capable of withstanding a natural disaster, in the best possible location. If you're home was destroyed during the natural disasters, you're not alone! Engineering disaster proof homes is an on-going process that will always require changes and critiques!

Resources  

Type 1 Resource -- PETE or PET (Polyethylene Terephthalate) Recycled soda, juice bottles and peanut butter jars and some jars for oils. This plastic can be recycled into new construction products including fabrics and carpet fibers! These products can be used as foundation for your home.
Type 2 Resource -- HDPE (High-Density Polyethylene) Recycled milk, juice, detergent, bleach and motor oil containers. When recycled, this plastic is used for lumber substitutes, trash and compost containers among other products! In this instance you will use materials such as this to form the walls and roof of your home.
Type 3 Resource -- V or PVC (Vinyl/Polyvinyl Chloride) Recycled PVC pipe or other sturdy plastics which can be used for windows, and doors for your home. This plastic can also be turned into fencing, sewer pipes, and strengthening ideas.
Type 4 Resource -- LDPE (Low-Density Polyethylene) Used for cellophane wrap, stretch wrap and squeeze bottles. This plastic is recycled and can be used to strengthen your homes structural stability.
Type 5 Resource -- PP (Polypropylene) Used for food containers and long underwear. This plastic is recycled into furniture, carpet and auto parts.
Type 6 Resource -- PS (Polystyrene) Also know as Styrofoam. This plastic is recycled into plastic wood, packing peanuts, office and desk accessories.
Type 7 – Resource STUDENTS SUPPLY - Other Plastics, Paper, and Metals This designation is for all other plastics that are difficult to recycle, paper, and metals. Students can travel to local recycling center to collect recycled metals, paper, or varying plastics that can be used during the building phase of the home.




        Evaluation


CATEGORY 4 Excellent 3 Good 2 Developing 1 Unsatisfactory   Score
Information Gathering Accurate information taken from several sources in a systematic manner. Accurate information taken from a couple of sources in a systematic manner. Accurate information taken from a couple of sources but not systematically. Information taken from only one source and/or information not accurate.
Plan Plan is neat with clear measurements and labeling for all components. Plan is neat with clear measurements and labeling for most components. Plan provides clear measurements and labeling for most components. Plan does not show measurements clearly or is otherwise inadequately labeled.
Construction -Materials Appropriate materials were selected and creatively modified in ways that made the structure stable. Appropriate materials were selected and there was an attempt at creative modification to make the structure stable. Appropriate materials were selected but materials were not used to make structure stable. Inappropriate materials were selected and contributed to a structure that fell apart.
Modification/Testing Clear evidence of troubleshooting, testing, and refinements based on structural stability, or instability of home. Some evidence of troubleshooting, testing and refinements based on structural stability, or instability of home. Little evidence of troubleshooting, testing and refinements based on structural stability, or instability of home. No evidence of troubleshooting, testing or refinement based on structural stability, or instability of home.
Coperative Group Involvment All members worked together and all played equal role in group. Some members of group were not involved at all times, and did not have an equal role. Group did not work well together but still created a structure that worked Individual or member of group did not work together as one, structure was not completed.


For an additional resource on creating rubrics see rubrics.html



        Conclusion


Think about your structure and how it withstood the natrual disasters that were demonstrated in class. Did your structure hold up?

In many situations homes are not made to withstand natural disasters and many times homes are destroyed or left in shambles. In this activity you created your own home that can withstand such disatsers.  You have seen the destruction natural disatsers can create and you should be proud of the home you built and the work your entire group has done. Congratulations! You now have the basic knowledge of building a home capable of withstanding a natural disaster.
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        Teacher Page


The teacher page (go to the Teacher Page) includes information to help other teachers implement the WebQuest, including: target learners, standards, notes for teaching the unit, and, in some cases, examples of student work.


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        Credits & References


"10 Types of Shelters for Natural Disasters :Construction Management Schools: Construction Management Degree." Construction Management Schools: Construction Management Degree. Web. 28 Apr. 2011. <http://www.constructionmanagementschools.net/blog/2010/10-types-of-shelters-for-natural-disasters/>.

"Material List, Home Construction, Construction Estimating." On-Line Construction Estimating Tool:Bids Are Just a Few of the Items American Dream Consulting Can Manage for You! Web. 28 Apr. 2011. <http://www.americandreamconsulting.com/constructionPage2.asp>.

"Video -- Tsunamis 101 -- National Geographic." Video -- Animals, Travel, Kids -- National Geographic. Web. 28 Apr. 2011. <http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/player/environment/environment-natural-disasters/tsunamis/tsunami-101.html>.

Natural Disaster Proof Homes. Web. 28 Apr. 2011. <http://www.californiaacontractor.com/>.

Green Roof & Earth Sheltered Homes & Building Systems Manufactured by Formworks Building, Inc. Web. 28 Apr. 2011. <http://www.formworksbuilding.com/>.

"Hurricane Proof, Disaster Proof, Earth Sheltered Homes That Are Environmentallyfriendly." Green Roof & Earth Sheltered Homes & Building Systems Manufactured by Formworks Building, Inc. Web. 28 Apr. 2011. <http://www.formworksbuilding.com/twister.html>.

"Disaster Proof Homes, Earthquake Proof Homes, Termite Proof Homes, Tornado Proof Homes, Hurricane Proof Homes, Fire Proof Homes." Hurricane, Earthquake, Fire, Tornado Proof, Fire Resistant Homes. Web. 28 Apr. 2011. <http://www.tridipanel.org/Currentprojects/index.htm>.

"Recycled Construction Materials." Nebraska Energy Office. Web. 28 Apr. 2011. <http://www.neo.ne.gov/home_const/factsheets/recycled_const_mat.htm>.

"Top 10 Most Terrifying Natural Disasters InĀ History." Top 10 Lists - Listverse. Web. 28 Apr. 2011. <http://listverse.com/2010/03/15/top-10-most-terrifying-natural-disasters-in-history/>.

"Video -- Katrina Day by Day -- National Geographic." Video -- Animals, Travel, Kids -- National Geographic. Web. 28 Apr. 2011. <http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/player/environment/environment-natural-disasters/hurricanes/katrina.html>.

"General - Graphic Organizers." EdHelper.com - Math, Reading Comprehension, Themes, Lesson Plans, and Printable Worksheets. Web. 28 Apr. 2011. <http://www.edhelperclipart.com/clipart/teachers/org-web.pdf>.

Disasters, Natural. "Pictures Of Destroyed Homes By Natural Disasters." Property Investment | Landlord Blog | Landlord Advice | Landlord Information. Web. 03 May 2011. <http://www.propertyinvestmentproject.co.uk/blog/pictures-of-destroyed-homes-by-natural-disasters/>.




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Comments or Questions can be sent to:

 jwarner@franklincollege.edu

spennington@franklincollege.edu 

Created: 4-April-2011
Last updated: 3-May-2011

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Based on a template from The WebQuest Page